Getting 'Steinached' was all the rage in Roaring ’20s (2017)

# · ✸ 87 · 💬 48 · 6 days ago · www.mcgill.ca · Vigier
They had been "Steinached!" The men had undergone a 20-minute procedure introduced by Dr. Eugen Steinach in which one of their seminal ducts was tied off. Biology professor Eugen Steinach thought Brown-Séquard's work with gonads was worth pursuing and turned to transplanting the testes of a male guinea pig into a female. Steinach bought into Voronoff's idea, but thought that the benefits ascribed to transplants could be achieved by an alternate procedure. In his book, Sex and Life, Steinach described how his patients "Changed from feeble, parched, dribbling drones, to men of vigorous bloom who threw away their glasses, shaved twice a day, dragged loads up to 220 pounds, and even indulged in such youthful follies as buying land in Florida." He believed in his procedure so strongly that he "Thrice reactivated himself." It isn't clear what he meant by "Thrice," because once the duct is tied off, it's tied off. Whatever improvement Steinach and his patients felt was probably due to wishful thinking, because as we now know, vasectomies do not boost hormonal output by the testes. Steinach had testimonials galore, including from some very famous people such as Sigmund Freud, who underwent the procedure when he was 67 years old, hoping to improve his "Sexuality, his general condition and his capacity for work." William Butler Yeats, the famed writer, was Steinached when he was 69. Today, testosterone and various derivatives are prescribed to men with low blood levels who often claim to experience the effects that were thirsted for by men who subjected their privates to the scalpels wielded by Drs. Steinach and Voronoff in the Roaring Twenties.
Getting 'Steinached' was all the rage in Roaring ’20s (2017)



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